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Monday, March 31, 2014

Swedish Corvette Stingray Police Car Needs a New Home

 

@ BOLD RIDE
Corvette Stingray Police 3

If you live in Sweden, and you’re in the market for something truly unique — look no further. While the new Chevrolet Corvette Stingray is a rarity in the Nordic region, this one with a full on police livery is literally one-of-a-kind. And it could be yours.

Fitted with a Z51 performance package, the Police Stingray was inspired by the Saleen Mustang police car in the original Transformers film. Coated in a black and white Stingray police livery, the Corvette also come with 19-inch front and 20-inch rear wheels, a limited slip differential, and only 230 miles on the odometer.

Corvette Stingray Police

For sale on Blocket, Bilcity Superbike Ltd (the company listing the Corvette), is asking about 780,000 Swedish Krona (approx. $120,000) for the V8-powered police cruiser. It’s pricey, but if you’re in Sweden, or willing to dish out some serious shipping fees, you can have your very own Corvette Stingray police car. Because why not?

Corvette Stingray Police 2

 

Trion Nemesis: A 2,000HP American Hypercar We Hope Will be Built

Trion Nemesis 2

“Vaporware” is a term that often describes cars that, on paper, seem perfect in every sense of the word, but often don’t actually see the light of day. This latest creation — coming from California-based Trion — hopes to be America’s first 2,000HP hypercar…if it finds its way to production.

Under the hood you’ll (hopefully) find a 5.0-liter twin-turbo V8 capable of the aforementioned 2,000 horsepower. Zero to 60 mph would only take 2.8 seconds, and top speed would sit just about 270 mph. Hypothetically, of course. There’s even renderings of a Nemesis E electric concept, which, we doubt will be part of initial production, if any.

Trion Nemesis

Reports suggest that Trion will begin production within the next month, partnered with Santa Ana-based N2A — which will manufacture the body components and interior. Let’s just hope this hypercar actually sees the light of day.



















 

Special Edition Venom GT, Porsche 911 Facelift, Mercedes AMG GT: Today’s Car News

By

@ MOTOR AUTHORITY        

 


Hennessey Venom GT World's Fastest Edition
Hennessey Venom GT World's Fastest Edition


Texan tuner Hennessey has unveiled a special edition version of its 270.4-mph Venom GT. The car is priced at $1.25 million and is already sold out.

Porsche is working on a facelift for its 911, and we’ve got our hands on a set of spy shots of a prototype for the Carrera model. The facelift will include some minor styling changes front and rear, and may see a major update to the car’s powertrain.

Another car featured in our spy shots in the past 24 hours is Mercedes-Benz’s upcoming AMG GT sports car, the replacement for the five-year-old SLS AMG. The
new car. is expected to be revealed this fall.

You'll find all of this and more in today's car news headlines from around the High Gear Media network, right here at Motor Authority.


Bertone Confirms Bankruptcy, Searches For Buyer

 By  

@  MOTOR AUTHORITY          


1970 Bertone Lancia Stratos HF Zero
1970 Bertone Lancia Stratos HF Zero

Legendary Italian styling house Bertone confirmed that it has entered bankruptcy proceedings. The Telegraph reports that the company. has racked up significant debt, and that a Bertone spokesperson confirmed employees haven't been coming to work for around one and a half months.

If a buyer isn't found by the end of April, Bertone could reportedly close for good. The Turin-based styling firm is evaluating proposals from foreign interests, but so far the only thing known about the potential suitors is that one of them is Turkish.

This isn't the first time in recent memory that Bertone has faced financial. trouble. The company went bankrupt in 2008, after which it was split into two entities: Carrozzeria Bertone, which handles coachbuilding, and Stile Bertone, which is purely a design firm.

 Financial problems continued to dog the company, and in 2009 it sold its manufacturing to plant to Fiat. In 2011, it sold a few cars from its collection to raise cash for debt service.

Bertone--which celebrated its 100th anniversary in 2012--has designed some of the most memorable concept an production cars ever to turn a wheel. Its credits include supercars like the Lancia Stratos and Lamborghini Miura and Countach, as well as the famous series of Alfa Romeo BAT concepts.


 More recently, its built the Jet 2+2--a shooting brake based on the Aston Martin Rapide--and the Nuccio, a concept to honor company founder Nuccio Bertone.

It would be a shame to see this icon of automotive styling pass into history, but the fate of Bertone should be decided by the end of next month.


 

Sunday, March 30, 2014

The 1956 Oldsmobile Golden Rocket: A Concept for the Jet Age

 

Boldride 
                   
 
But people in the 50s also wondered what the world would look like in the coming years: would it be a technological wonderland or a nuclear nightmare? One of the best expressions of this fascination with the future was the 1956 Oldsmobile Golden Rocket, which was distinct even by GM concept car standards.
 
00-Golden Rocket


The Rocket made its appearance at the 1956 GM Motorama. It was a cross between a 1950s fighter jet and a spaceship straight out of science fiction. The Rocket’s rear fenders looked like…well, like rockets.

 It offered a split rear window like that of the later ’63 Stingray, and tailfins which, for the time, were considered understated. The rocket theme continued in the front, which featured chrome “bumper bullets” and sleek aerodynamic contouring.

Where the Rocket really shined, however, was in its interior layout. The leather upholstery was blue and gold, with a speedometer in the center console and a real innovation for the time: a tilt steering wheel. The controls were designed to look like aircraft cockpit levers, and the windshield swept back for dramatic effect.

01-Golden Rocket

The roof was made up of two adjoining panels. They came together in the center but rotated out when someone exited the vehicle. The buckets seats swiveled outwards as well, neatly depositing the occupant in the outside world. From that point, he or she would presumably head to the closest spaceport to catch a flight to the moon.
 
The Rocket had a 275 ci engine under its hood, but details on the other internals are sadly lacking. The car itself seems to have vanished into smoke after the ’56 Motorama. Perhaps it took a journey into time and will appear on the streets in 2056, where it will blend in seamlessly with the other vehicles of the future. As with all things, time will tell.
 
 
 
 

1955 Mercedes-Benz 300 SLR Uhlenhaut Coupe



Zuugnap

BoldRide

 


 

                                                                                                       The Mercedes-Benz 300 SLR was a sports car in 1955. Of the nine W196s chassis built, one was destroyed in the Le Mans disaster.

 Of the eight that remained (and prior to the accident) Mercedes motorsport chief Rudolf Uhlenhaut had ordered two to be set aside for modification into a sort of hybrid between the SLR and the SL, featuring a slightly widened version of the SLR's chassis with enclosed bodywork for aerodynamic purposes.

Again, the strong, high sill beams of the spaceframe required the fitment of the same famous 'gull-wing' top-hinged doors of the other two types. For testing, and in preparation for a possible Mercedes participation in the 1956 race season, two road-legal SLRs were built.

Due to Mercedes' planned withdrawal from competitive motorsport at the end of 1955, the program was abandoned, leaving Uhlenhaut to use one of the cars as a company car. This prolonged road use required the fitting of an extra suitcase-sized muffler to the near-unsilenced exhaust pipes to avoid arrest for breach of the peace.

 This Uhlenhaut CoupĆ© was regarded as the world's fastest car in the 1950s, and it is rumored that, running late for a meeting, Uhlenhaut exploited the unlimited autobahns to make today's two-and-a-half-hour journey from Munich to Stuttgart (approximately 137 miles/220km) in just over an hour.


 The Uhlenhaut Coupe was road tested by the US magazine Motor Trend and by two English journalists from Automobile Revue at four o'clock in the morning on a closed section of motorway outside Munich. The latter wrote; "We are driving a car which barely takes a second to overtake the rest of the traffic and for which 120 mph on a quiet motorway is little more than walking pace.

 With its unflappable handling through corners, it treats the laws of centrifugal force with apparent disdain," after a total of more than 2,000 miles (3,200 km). His only regret was that this was a sports car "which we will never be able to buy and which the average driver would never buy anyway.”
Source: Wikipedia, 2011

Six Wheels and Nuclear Powered: The Forgotten Ford Seattle-ite Concept

 

@ BOLD RIDE
 
00-Ford Seattle-ite

Too often, the notion of the “concept car” is watered down by automakers getting their production cars ready for the public. When you see a “production ready concept” like many new Hondas and Acuras, you might say “oh the production car stayed really true to the concept,” but the concept car itself was not nearly daring enough. We need to get back to a time when the concept car meant something. Like in the 1960s.

The onset of the jet age in aviation also captured the imagination of the motoring public. A great example of this is the 1962 Ford Seattle-ite XXI; a six-wheeled concept with aspirations that far exceeded the technological capabilities of the time.


01-Ford Seattle-ite

The Seattle-ite had jaw-dropping lines, but it was the proposed technology under the hood that makes it so special. The designers envisioned the vehicle having computer navigation– even though no such technology would be available in road cars for decades to come.
Designers proposed that the concept would have fuel cells, which would be interchangeable with various types of fuel systems. It was even conceived that it could be nuclear powered!

02-Ford Seattle-ite

Many of the ideas surrounding this car are being considered today. The Seattle-ite was designed so that the front section and its 400+ horsepower-engine could be swapped out with a smaller section, with 60 horsepower, for city driving.

Consider the BMW i3. It going to be sold from the dealership as either a fully electric vehicle, or available with an optional range-extender. The range extender is a small (647cc) gas engine from its motorcycle range. This engine would charge the batteries to give the i3 even more range. While we’re not completely to the point of modular engine options, the i3 is a great example of the vision of the Seattle-ite, come to fruition.




 

Your Ride: 1968 Plymouth Fury III

 

@ BOLD RIDE
Plymouth Fury III 5

One of our readers, Joe, sent us photos of his stunning 1968 Plymouth Fury III. Built from the ground up, this bold classic defines one man’s love for his American muscle car. Read the full story below:

Plymouth Fury III 2

How did you acquire your ride?

I bought the car in California because I lived in Ohio, and it is just to hard to find one that doesn’t have a bunch of rust.

What drew you in when you bought it?

I looked for several years for a ’68 Fury Fastop. This was a car that I had when I first got my drivers license and I really liked that car.


Plymouth Fury III

What do you feel like when you drive it?
I really love to drive the car. It does get a lot of attention and does great at car shows.

What would you change about your car, if anything?

The thing about this car is that I did all the work myself and did it exactly the way I wanted it. So there is nothing I would do to change it.

Plymouth Fury III 4

Joe was a man of few words, but when you own a car as bad as this Fury, the car speaks for itself. We’ve come across a lot of classics, but few are as clean (without overdoing it) as this amazing old-school Plymouth!



 

Saturday, March 29, 2014

“Disintegrating Cars” is Stunning Destruction, Suspended in Time

 

Boldride
                    
       
Any car enthusiast worth their salt has a few favorite car cutaways. For me, it’s the Ferrari 250 GTO. It’s hard not to love the sketch of the V12 nestled between front wheels in driver, in perfect “front-mid” configuration. The cutaway’s lesser-known, but equally cool cousin is the “explosion,” in which a car or engine is disassembled and spread out in an arrangement that provides some logic to the assembly process.
There are some very cool explosion diagrams of engines and entire vehicles, but they are nothing like these incredible displays seen here. They are the creation of Fabien Oefner, and it is an art installation called “Disintegrating Cars” and is currently on display at M.A.D. Gallery (Mechanical Art Devices) in Geneva. Each work is truly breathtaking.
Mercedes SL

 
Each car looks like it is a full-size vehicle, disassembled and suspended, but they are actually meticulous scale models. Fabien Oefner spends two months painstakingly placing each piece in position in hundreds of phases for hundreds of individual shots. Cars include the Jaguar E-Type, Mercedes-Benz 30o SLR, and gorgeous Ferrari 330 P4.
Jaguar E-Type
 
There is no use of CGI, but Oefner, said the very real pieces take inspiration from computer graphics:
I have always been fascinated by the clean, crisp looks of 3D renderings. So I tried to use that certain type of aesthetic and combine it with the strength of real photography. These images are also about capturing time: either in stopping it as in the Hatch series or inventing it as in the Disintegrating series
These images are truly breathtaking, and are perfect wallpaper material! You can see all of his “Disintegrating Cars” work here.
 
 

Rare Porsche 911 GT1 Evo Strassenversion For Sale

 

MotorAuthority
                    
 
Rare Porsche 911 GT1 Evo Strassenversion For Sale
                        
Porsche is back in the top tier of Le Mans racing this year, but the company has a rich history in the series, not the least of which involves a limited run of cars in the late 1990s as homologation specials, including the 911 GT1 Evo Strassenversion.

The street-going version of the 911 GT1 race car, the Strassenversion--or, more properly, the StraƟenversion--is just barely road-legal. It's a mid-engined, 592-horsepower, 2,530-pound (dry weight) race car for the road. And now one of the 20 1998 GT1 Evo homologation cars built is up for sale, chassis #6010.
 
A twin-turbo 3.2-liter flat-six engine mated to a six-speed H-pattern gearbox, brilliant yellow paint, full leather interior (with Recaro racing seats), carbon disc brakes, and a rich winning history at Le Mans also come with the car. According to the seller, this is thought to be the only yellow example built.

As rare as the road-going 911 GT1s are, they do come up for sale occasionally, including
a silver example in 2012 and a white one in 2011. The car sold in 2012 was listed at $2,325,000; in 2011 the white car listed at $1,700,000.

There's no price listed on this yellow example, but you can find more details and images of the car at the
official sale listing on Trofeo Cars.
 

The Best-Selling Cop Car Is Actually An SUV

 

The Car Connection 
                   
        

The Best-Selling Cop Car Is Actually An SUV
                        

It's not your imagination: those flashing lights in your rearview mirror are a bit higher than they used to be. That's because America's best-selling police car is actually an SUV: the Police Interceptor Utility, based on the Ford Explorer.
 
Technically speaking, the Explorer is more of a crossover these days. Purists will tell you that SUVs, like pickup trucks, are body-on-frame vehicles, while crossovers are unibody vehicles, like cars. Though the Explorer was once a bona fide SUV, during the 2011 redesign, it switched to the same unibody platform that underlies the Ford Taurus, the Lincoln MKS sedan, and the Volvo XC70 station wagon.  But putting aside semantics for a moment, the bigger story here is the demise of the time-honored police cars.
 
In 2012, Ford replaced the ubiquitous, law-enforcement version of its Crown Victoria with two new, police-friendly models: the Police Interceptor Utility and the Police Interceptor Sedan. And last year, the Interceptor Utility outsold every other police vehicle in the U.S. All told, Ford sold 13,556 Interceptor Utilities in 2013.
 
That put the Utility ahead of the #2 police vehicle, a modified Dodge Charger. The Interceptor Sedan nabbed the bronze. Given the way that crossovers and SUVs have taken off with the general public since the 1990s, we're a bit surprised that it took this long for police vehicles to make the switch from cars to utes. After all, officers have to haul loads of equipment, from weapons to hazmat suits to riot gear, and vehicles like the Explorer are tailor-made for hauling. 
 
 They also tend to be easier to get into and out of, and they provide plenty of room for the laptops that nearly all police vehicles carry, mounted to swing-arms attached to the dashboard. And of course, SUVs and crossovers offer a higher seating position, which is important for officers who need to see the lay of the land.
 
 In fact, the only major shortcoming of SUVs and crossovers is fuel economy (gas being a major expense for fleets that are constantly on the move). That may explain why Ford's Police Interceptor Utility is so popular, given its available EcoBoost engine.

 At tests carried out last year by the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department, the Interceptor Utility EcoBoost model outperformed all other vehicles in both lap times and 0-to-100 acceleration.

 It's not your imagination: those flashing lights in your rearview mirror are a bit higher than they used to be. That's because  the Police Interceptor Utility, based on the Ford Explorer.
 
Technically speaking, the Explorer is more of a crossover these days. Purists will tell you that SUVs, like pickup trucks, are body-on-frame vehicles, while crossovers are unibody vehicles, like cars. Though the Explorer was once a bona fide SUV, during the 2011 redesign, it switched to the same unibody platform that underlies the Ford Taurus, the Lincoln MKS sedan, and the Volvo XC70 station wagon.

 
But putting aside semantics for a moment, the bigger story here is the demise of the time-honored police car. In 2012, Ford replaced the ubiquitous, law-enforcement version of its Crown Victoria with two new, police-friendly models: the Police Interceptor Utility and the Police Interceptor Sedan. And last year, the Interceptor Utility outsold every other police vehicle in the U.S.

All told, Ford sold 13,556 Interceptor Utilities in 2013. That put the Utility ahead of the #2 police vehicle, a modified Dodge Charger. The Interceptor Sedan nabbed the bronze.

Given the way that crossovers and SUVs have taken off with the general public since the 1990s, we're a bit surprised that it took this long for police vehicles to make the switch from cars to utes. After all, officers have to haul loads of equipment, from weapons to hazmat suits to riot gear, and vehicles like the Explorer are tailor-made for hauling.
 
They also tend to be easier to get into and out of, and they provide plenty of room for the laptops that nearly all police vehicles carry, mounted to swing-arms attached to the dashboard. And of course, SUVs and crossovers offer a higher seating position, which is important for officers who need to see the lay of the land.

In fact, the only major shortcoming of SUVs and crossovers is fuel economy (gas being a major expense for fleets that are constantly on the move). That may explain why Ford's Police Interceptor Utility is so popular, given its available EcoBoost engine.

 At tests carried out last year by the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department, the Interceptor Utility EcoBoost model outperformed all other vehicles in both lap times and 0-to-100 acceleration.



 

1966 Ford Mustang Meets Volvo Wagon: A Marriage Of Convenience?

 

MotorAuthority 
                   
If you're asking yourself why anyone would want to graft a Volvo 240DL's wagon roof and hatch onto a Ford Mustang, let us know when you find out. We're asking ourselves the same question.
 
Okay, so it's not so hard to figure out why someone would want to make a Mustang shooting brake, or "sedan delivery," as it's styled by the eBay seller. It's a classic automotive reverse mullet: party in the front, business in the back; a place to put plenty of gear while still having the muscle car you've always wanted. It's practical, after a fashion.
 
In the case of this particular example, there are many things to like: the long, low profile; the midnight purple paint; the apparently clean and tidy marriage of Volvo and Mustang bodywork. But looking more closely, there are details that don't quite work: the dated digital gauge cluster; the questionably upholstered interior (is that genuine Naugahyde?); the mini-hearse-like proportions of the rear cargo area.
 
 
But under the hood lives a beastly 514-cubic-inch carbureted V-8 engine. For those who think only in metric when it comes to displacement, that's 8.4 liters--as big as a Viper's V-10. The transmission, rear end, steering, and other performance pieces have also been upgraded to sportier standards. It's only traveled about 200 miles since completion, says the seller.

You can find this
gearhead's griffin on eBay at a current bid price of $35,100--and only 18 hours left on the auction clock.
1966 Ford Mustang paired with Volvo 240DL wagon for unique 'sedan delivery' on eBay
 
 




 
 

Friday, March 28, 2014

The top 10 high quality, low-cost used cars through mechanics' eyes

Motoramic

@ YAHOO AUTOS

 
Quality. Everybody wants it. But how do you get it in a car without having to pay more money?
 
This is a question I have dealt with for nearly 15 years of my life as a car dealer, auto auctioneer, and part-owner of an auto auction. My life revolves around trying to "hit em' where they ain't" when it comes to used cars.
 
Over the years I've seen certain distinct patterns as to which older used cars last, and which ones become rolling money pits. To figure this all out in a statistical way, I co-developed a long-term reliability study that gathers data from the inspectors who rate used vehicles trade-ins at dealerships and auto auctions around the country, and ranks models for their long-term mechanical integrity.
 
The use of independent professionals, instead of car owners, was done for two important reasons.
 
 
First, owners can often look at their vehicles through rose-colored glasses. A car that shifts funny or has upper engine noise may seem to be perfectly fine to a person who has driven it every day for years on end. Independent professionals and dealers who inspect thousands of vehicles are often easily able to see the very things that these types of owners overlook.
 
Second, my partners and I wanted to eliminate all forms of brand bias from the study. Owners tend to be more forgiving of vehicles that come from an automaker that has satisfied them in the past.
 
Even if their car is now cheap and trouble prone, their prior car they owned from the same manufacturer may have been a high-quality masterpiece. 
 
The goal of this study was to provide honest and detailed information to the millions of people who buy older used cars. At the moment we now have over 330,000 data samples spread throughout the United States.
 
The findings?
 
The most important ingredient in the recipe is still the prior owners. However, it turns out that some cars that are unpopular, or discontinued, can last well beyond their peers at a price thousands less than popular alternatives:
 

 
Saturn L200: Do you know what this is? Neither do the majority of Americans. The L-Series was a one-generation wonder that never caught on. In our study the four cylinder automatic models are proving to be more reliable than their Honda Accord peers, and still offer a steep discount in the retail car market.
 

 
Ford Crown Victoria: The Lincoln Town Car and Mercury Grand Marquis are based on the same platform. For those just looking for a beater, and don't drive very much, the price of a government issued Crown Vic is the cheapest durable buy you can find on a pound-per-pound basis. Government surplus auction models that haven't seen police duty are tough to beat.
 

 
Buick Park Avenue: In our study we're finding that the vehicle kept for the longest time is not Lexus or Mercedes-Benz. It's Buick. The Park Avenue benefits from an outstanding powertrain — the GM 3.8-liter V-6 built for decades — in non-supercharged models, and a mature clientele that's usually willing to invest in a car's proper maintenance.
 

 
Buick Lucerne: Another one generation wonder, the Buick Lucerne replaced the Park Avenue and older models brought forward the 3.8 liter V-6 engine found in the Park Avenue.
 

 
Chevrolet Corvette: The Corvette benefits from long model runs, a robust V8 engine that can comfortably cruise at extremely low rpm's, and an enthusiast base that usually takes pride in keeping these sports cars in sound mechanical shape.
 

 
Chevrolet Prizm: Also known as the Geo Prizm, these cars are mechanically identical to the Toyota Corolla which is currently the best selling car in the world. Prizms often sell for cheaper prices than the Corolla, even though both cars were built in the same factory for well over two decades. 
 

 
Pontiac Vibe: After the Prizm was discontinued, Toyota and GM decided to continue their joint venture with the Pontiac Vibe and the Toyota Matrix. The Vibe is usually priced cheaper than the Matrix due to GM folding the Pontiac division in 2009.
 

 
Jeep Cherokee: The Cherokee remained popular throughout its entire model run. The 4-liter "High Output" 190-hp straight-six engine used almost exclusively from 1991 through 2001 has proven to be exceptionally durable.
 

 
BMW Z4: Although the Z4 was priced at a $15,000 to $20,000 premium over the Mazda MX-5 Miata when new, as an older used vehicle, it usually only commands a couple thousand more dollars while offering a comparable level of reliability. For those who are looking for a roadster that isn't a Miata, the Z4 definitely deserves a look.
Infiniti M35: The styling of the M35 never caught on and this carried forward to their resale values. The M35 is usually anywhere between $6,000 to $8,000 less than the Lexus GS, Audi A6 and the Mercedes E-Class, while offering long-term reliability that matches or eclipses all of these models. 
 

March 26: Ormond Beach, Florida hosted the first time trials on this date in 1903

Motoramic

@YAHOO AUTOS
                   
     
 
  
 
                                                           The Olds Pirate
On this date in 1903, the first sanctioned speed trials took place at Ormond Beach, Florida. Back in those days, paved roads were almost unheard of, so Ormond's hard straightaway of packed sand proved the perfect venue for "speeding" (see the video below). Later, neighboring Daytona Beach would get all the fame, but Ormond remains speed's birthplace. As a stone monument in Ormond proudly proclaims:
"At a time when America had few paved roads, this hard beach was a racecourse for automobiles, motorcycles, and their pioneering builders. The first sanctioned meet here -- from March 26-28, 1903 -- featured time trials and races for a field including Alexander Winton's Bullet, Ransom E. Olds' Pirate, and Oscar Hedstrom's Indian motorcycle. The racers broke U.S. and world records, and Ormond Beach became a favorite venue for motor sports and automobile testing. This is the Birthplace of Speed."-

Cruising Through 1960 New York in a Vintage Impala Convertible

                                       

A lot has changed since the early 1960s, but to help you remember the “good ‘ole days,” we thought this vintage commercial would be beneficial!


The 1960 model year was important for the relatively new Chevy Impala. Not only did it mark the last year of the second-generation, it also brought about a more modernized design set.

Unlike the 1958 Impalas, which featured sky-high tail fins, and the 1959s, which featured defined outward facing fins, the 1960 Impala model was more subdued than previous years.

Not only were the ’60s Impala’s fins toned down considerably, gone were the days of uber amounts of chrome (though some still did exist) flanking the model’s sides.

 Also gone were the “nostril” air intakes above the car’s headlights, and teardrop taillights, which were replaced with the three round taillight design seen in the the first-generation car. New models also featured a radical new white stripe flanking the rear quarter panels.

With new features and perks comes new advertisement techniques, so Chevy took to the streets of New York to show off their prized new Impala. As we’re sure Chevy made a priority, everyone noticed.

Though we’re not sure why the Impala appears to be piloted by an invisible force, it’s neat to see the now vintage car in its element, in the days when it was brand new.

What other vintage Chevy commercials or advertisements stand out to you from the 1950s and 60s? Let us know, and we’ll try to feature more right here!